Disgusted of Chipping Norton

Originally posted on The Plastic Hippo:

Image via upr.fr

Image via upr.fr

There can be few things as unintentionally funny as witnessing a conman bluster manufactured outrage after being accused of being a conman and then proven to be a conman. The usual defence of indignant silence when presented with evidential facts goes out of the window once the game is up. When the stock response to being caught red handed is not to dignify sordid allegations of being bang to rights with a rebuttal will not work, then the only course of action is to summon up carefully rehearsed apoplectic fury.

David Cameron`s tub-thumping lectern abuse in Brussels on Friday was not just hilarious, but also smacked of a chocolate covered kid denying he had stolen the Mars Bar. To be fair to the Chipping Norton conman, being presented with an unexpected bill for nearly £1.7billion would make any of us bang the table and search out someone…

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Midge Mk2 build diary. (chassis work complete)

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After what seems like an age, the rejuvenating of the SJ chassis is complete. Anything that is still rusty in the pictures is being replaced by new bits so no thinking I’m being slapdash.IMAG0094 IMAG0069

Connor had a lesson in making fuel lines and I set about the painful task of cutting the stainless steel braided fuel line. The final job was to give everything a good clean with Bilt Hamner Surfex HD and the jetwash. This included the drive which has suffered a real hammering over the last few weeks. I am smugly happy with the finished job and looking back at pre clean up photos it is hard to believe how far it has come on.

As Connor has finished college for a while, I have taken the coming week off work so that we can start the bodywork and I really can’t wait; so I didn’t. The first job was to seal the floor from the elements using a concoction of PVA glue and Wilkinsons exterior wood and metal paint as suggested by John Cowperthwaite in his car build manual. I was a little less than convinced but there is no denying the finished panels look amazing. I mixed the glue and undercoat and applied it with an emulsion roller over the plywood which had been pretreated with watered down PVA. The resulting textured effect was very pleasing. After being allowed to dry properly I finished with a couple of coats of satin black applied with a gloss roller. I tested the strength of the finish with my fingernail and the fingernail lost, who needs emery boards when you have a Midge floor?

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So that is where we are. Tuesday the interesting work starts for real, I will try and update my blog daily but if I can’t the pictures should make it to Twitter with monotonous frequency at @aideym

 

midge Mk2 build diary

I experienced my first session of car build blues over the last couple of weeks. I know it won’t be the last but as I write the latest update it is more with a sense of relief that satisfaction.
The task involved removing and renovating the front axle and leaf springs which were very grubby at best. They had been married for the last 30 years and were quite happy with their lot. Removing them was never going to be easy even with the assistance of an angle grinder.

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I didn’t even try to undo the U bolts, I just cut half way through them and the snapped them off. This was before I discovered that replacements weighed in at £60 a set. It wouldn’t have altered the modus operandi, it would just have been executed with moist eyes. The rubber bushes had melded into a compound with the steel springs and had to be part drilled, part burned to remove them. I got a replacement set for a reasonable £35 although they were cheap by virtue of being a rather strange shade of purple.

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The next step was to separate the spring leaves, should that be leafs? And then dump them in a bath of rust remover. The bath was fashioned from shuttering ply from the oddments bin at the local time merchants. I lined this with a waterproof membrane and was ready to add the remover. Now the observant reader may notice that this membrane changes colour in the pictures, this wasn’t as a result of the chemical process but because there is waterproof and waterproof. Just because a material repels moisture doesn’t mean it will contain it. I therefore advocate the use of builders membrane over tarpaulin.

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The rust removal was one again left to a Bilt  Hamner product, the Oxy C in the bath and the Oxy Gel on the bits I couldn’t get in the bath. The C makes 20 litres of solution per kilo of material. This was more than adequate for my needs. It is biodegradable and contains no nasty chemicals. The parts soaked for a couple of days and then washed off. The results were nothing short of remarkable.

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The gel didn’t produce the same level of rust removal but it was far better than I would have managed by any other means available to me and certainly once the paint was applied the finish was none the poorer.

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Armed with paint brushes and Hammerite Smooth Black I spent the next few years covering the rejuvenated parts to a satisfactory standard. It only took a couple of coats but at the same time I had decided to paint the anti roll bar and the steering box silver. As I couldn’t get any brush paint from Wilkos, I resorted to using spray and even though a little more work had to put in to masking parts off and more consideration given to overspray, I think the finished result was far better and worth the extra effort. For that reason when I do the next batch of parts I will be spraying them.

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After putting it off for a number of days I finally got on with the inevitable and rebuilt the springs and mated everything together. For no apparent reason I had a mare of a job getting the new U bolts into place, it took two hours to persuade them to play nice and the rest of the connecting up took another two hours. I am getting too old and infirm for bullying car parts but as I stood back and admired the handiwork I had to admit it was worth it.

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I will be reconditioning the swivel hubs at a later date and it makes sense to paint them when they are apart. Now that is a job I am looking forward to as I became increasingly sick to the back teeth of painting. I still have the back axle to do so I had best man up and get it done over the next week so the drive can be used again.

The Midge Mk2 build diary

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As I sat regaining my lungs overlooking the Isle of Man from the lofty viewpoint of St Bees Head I couldn’t help thinking that Alfred Wainwright was on to something with his gushing love of the Lake District. I also couldn’t help thinking he could sod walking it and that he was missing a trick. The motor car was beginning to take a hold of the hearts and minds of modern Britain and with the unfortunate exception of breaking down on Hardknott Pass, it is a damn sight easier on the body.

And so it was I returned from my week in Beatrix Potter land refreshed and with renewed motivation to get on with the Midge Mk11 build. The chassis had been languishing in my lockup as a result of a lack of funds and an insurmountable incline into the garage. I am sure Wainwright would have included it on one of his walks had he not been otherwise occupied in Cumbria.

With a week of nights in front of me, I was presented with the chance to get a few hours in each day and I was keen to get the chassis painted and deal with the tricky logistical problem at the lock up. At the time of writing it has mostly been a successful week.

First off I decided to do something about the brakes, there was a lot of rust on the calipers and they were partially seized to the discs. This certainly wasn’t helping with moving the car about and needed to be dealt with sooner than later. I took the cheap option to de-rust them by the power of electrolysis and although this is something akin to alchemy it only requires a battery charger, a bucket and some household chemicals. The negative lead connects to the rusty metal and the positive lead connects to a sacrificial piece of steel. The whole lot, excluding the charger is plunged into a bath of Sodium Carbonate (washing soda) and then the magic takes over. As I stand holding shiny, rust free calipers with a smug look on my face I can’t help feeling grateful that science was invented.

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It’s just your basic science innit!

The task of preparing the chassis for painting took a fair bit of time and the pile of redundant bits of dead metal grew further as did the pile of smuggled farm yard. The metal fuel lines had rusted through in a couple of places and a number of bolts firmly tightened in Japan led to interesting times, especially with only one proper working arm. I suspect I will be buying an impact gun to compliment my newly purchased compressor in very short order.

Eventually (three sessions) I was ready to paint. The chassis was solid with just a few areas of scabby surface rust. These were treated with the very excellent Bilt Hamner Hydrate 80 before being washed down with thinners and elbow grease. After spending hours pouring over chassis paint specifications I ended up using Frost Black Chassis paint primarily because I had a chassis I wanted black, it was also cheap. Application involved heating the paint to 25 degrees and then adding white spirit. It was very easy to apply and most of it ended up on the car and not on me which was a result. I have to say I am extremely pleased with how it looks and the resplendent black has a slimming effect on the chassis whilst the glossy coat has lifted and revitalised the look, throwing back the seven signs of aging, (rust, grime and five others).

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The Hydrate 80 at work

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After

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The next jobs on the list are reconditioning the leaf springs and sorting the pipe work out, more next payday. Now all I have to do is get the thing back into the lockup before Linda needs the drive again.

It’s Show Time

Being an apparently seasoned blogger with a commitment to supplying the latest gossip and up to the minute updates I suppose it was expected of me to put something together with regard to my visit to the Practical Classics Renovation show at the NEC which occurred over the weekend. And so it was that I received my ticket in good time only to discover the day before that the ticket had gone missing and with batteries for the camera fully charged I managed to arrive at the NEC sans memory cards. Not to worry I could always phone home except I had also managed to leave my phone at home too. Oh well, you will just have to take my word for it when stating how fabulous it was to visit the show.

The show was held in two on the many Halls at the NEC which indicates it probably wasn’t a massive event. A quarter of one of the halls was turned over to an auction for “barn find” cars. It surprises me just how many barns are left undiscovered in a country equipped with more surveillance cameras per capita than any other in the civilised world, let alone the numerous Aston Martins and Rolls Royces’ left to fester in them. In fact, part of my manifesto for leader of the world will make claiming barn find vehicles punishable by death. Parking a knackered Nova in a garage for two years whilst enthusiastically contemplating making it road worthy does not  qualify as making a barn find when you come to move it after being evicted by the council.

The majority of the first hall was turned over to autojumble stalls with the odd exception of a few well known retailers. I had a whale of a time browsing through their offerings although I had a very strict shopping list required for the midge project their was no harm in having a look. It was at this point when I happened across Chris Barrie cutting a slightly strange figure dressed in a tweed suit, I decided not to engage him in conversation as he reminded me too much of a Tory for me to feel comfortable in his company. Hopefully it was an act. Other notable celebrities  on show were Edd China, Mike Brewer and Fuzz Townsend. None of which were wearing Tweed but similarly I avoided talking to them as I am clearly not worthy. Mike Brewer came across as a genuinely nice guy, Edd came across as a bigger celebrity than I thought he would and Fuzz had a great hat.

I can’t help feeling a number of companies that should have been there and weren’t have missed a trick. There is certainly more than a passing interest in car renovation, classic vehicles and getting your hands dirty but the industry innovators were largely missing and that is a shame as Britain is a nation of tinkerers looking for something to make their own and this show was an ideal platform to give them direction.

In my next blog I hope I will have put some of my purchases to good use as I expect to get the chassis painted and the brake and fuel lines replaced. Well there’s hoping.