The simple task of removing the body from a Suzuki SJ Part 2

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The story so far. We took one innocent and un-abused Suzuki SJ413 away from the farm it had retired to 11 years ago with the sole intention of taking it apart and discarding all the pretty bits to enable us to rebody the chassis into something more interesting, namely a replica of a 1930’s open top sports car. This is day 2 and aside from a few wires, cables and bolts the task is all but done.

The first job of the day was to get the chassis and the body separated. The theory was the six bolts would come undone with little or no persuasion and we would place chocks between the two parts, this worked a treat on the front as both chassis bolts snapped off in the chassis, the other four surrendered a lot easier but there things started to go awry. Despite a fair deal of brutality the body wouldn’t part. The angle grinder was called in to action and despite the removal of the offending bolts, everything stayed put. At this point common sense would dictate that there had to be more bolts somewhere. Unfortunately there was 1/2 a tonne of Buckinghamshire on the underside of the car. After a few minutes I was wearing most of the mud and two more bolts had revealed themselves. With some relief the body finally separated and we were back under way. The remainder of the work passed without hitch, it just seemed never ending. As lunch time arrived we were in a position to take the body to the metal recyclers. The easiest way was to strap the body down to the chassis and take it lock and stock, get them to remove the body with their forklift and return the chassis home and for once everything went as planned.

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(If only I had actually taken a picture of the body coming off then we would have something interesting to put here, in absence of something interesting, here are the pictures of the before and after.)

Once home the final job was to remove Buckinghamshire and return the chassis to the garage. We had some fun with the pressure washer and stood back to admire the results.

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(The two blue bags in the background contain the swept up mud that was attached to the chassis)

Time was getting on and Connor had a train to catch so we shot round to the garage and then we hit upon the bit I hadn’t really planned properly, or indeed, at all. Getting a now non running SJ back into a seriously uphill garage. Things started out ok, we got it squared up and it was moving pretty freely right up to the pot hole one metre before the door. Try as we might we couldn’t move it further. I tried to use the towball of my car against the chassis, which seemed like a really good idea to me. The fact that Connor didn’t think it was should have warned me of the dangers as Connor rarely thinks. Ten minutes and one dint in the bumper later, the SJ was at the bottom of the slope with my towball hooked under the chassis. After much cursing and a trip home for resources (a lump of 4×4) I was just strapping the wood to the chassis when a nice Polish chap turned up and set about manhandling the car into the garage pretty much single handedly. I couldn’t thank him enough but I am now pretty afraid of getting the car out the garage again.

As the monthly car budget has been spent, there won’t be much work done until after Easter but I do need to rig something up to get over the mountain in front of the garage. I think I will look at rigging up a winch system or for the time-being seeing if the starter motor will stand up to the task. I cetainly won’t be experimenting without reinforcements, just in case it won’t.

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